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The Orvis Fly Fishing Guide Podcast

Produced by The Orvis Company and hosted by Tom Rosenbauer, author of The Orvis Fly Fishing Guide, this podcast will provide you with tips on how to get the most of your time on the water. Read more about Orvis at www.orvis.com/podcast.

In this episode Tom gives his list of what you could get that angler, and angler-to-be at the last minute!

Direct download: Toms_Christmas_List.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 2:02pm EDT

This week we range in topics from toilet paper to bass leaders, but the main topic is one that is frequently requested: How to make sense of the thousands of patterns of dry flies into a reasonable number that will cover most of the hatches you encounter. I offer 10 tips on slimming down your fly box (or filling it up, depending on where you are in the game) plus my favorite dozen dry flies.

Direct download: Toms_Ten_Tips_for_Filling_Your_Fly_Box.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 2:59pm EDT

Welcome to another installment of "Ask an Orvis Fly-Fishing Instructor," with Peter Kutzer. In this episode, Peter explains the differences between the parachute cast and the pile cast, both of which are slack-line casts that can be useful when you're fishing across conflicting currents or to a fish downstream. To make a parachute cast, you stop the rod high and keep the tip up while the fly and front of the line land on the water. This gives you a belly of line between the rod tip and the water. As your fly drifts downstream, you lower the rod tip, feeding line into the drift and maintaining contact with the fly. To make a pile cast, you shoot the line high again, but this time, you drop the rod tip to the water's surface in front of the fly, dragging the line downward. This causes the line to land in a pile, so the fly can dead-drift freely.

Direct download: How_to_Fly_Fish-_The_Parachute_and_Pile_Casts.mp4
Category:general -- posted at: 12:41pm EDT

This week we do a podcast I've been looking forward to--an interview with a couple of top fly-fishing guides about what it's like to be a guide and how to get into guiding. Learn about how a guide prepares for their day, what they agonize over, and enjoy a few wild stories along the way.

Direct download: A_Guides_Life-_How_To_Become_One_And_What_Its__Really_Like.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 4:27pm EDT

In this week's podcast I announce the winner of the Podcast Suggestion Contest, who won a signed copy of my latest book Essential American Flies.  The topic is sure to be a crowd-pleaser to most of you--targeting bigger trout. In the podcast I give you 10 suggestions for targeting the biggest trout in a pool or in a stretch of river. 

There were lots of great suggestions in the podcast contest, and I used a couple for the short Fly Box section at the beginning of the podcast:  How to cure the fall blues after a tough fishing season, and how to pack for a business trip where you might grab a few hours fishing.  Plus a terrific tip on rigging dry droppers on our podcast request line from a listener in Georgia.

Direct download: Toms_Ten_Tips_for_Targeting_Large_Trout_4.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:14am EDT

This week I interview George Daniel, past competitor in Team Fly Fishing USA and now head coach. The subject is European nymphing styles like Czech nymphing, Polish nymphing, French nymphing, and Spanish nymphing.

I've had a number of requests to talk about European nymphing so I called in one of the top American experts on these techniques. You'll learn the differences between these styles and under which conditions you use them, as well as how to rig for these very effective styles of catching trout and grayling on nymphs. These techniques are great to have in your bag of tricks when standard strike indicator and dry/dropper techniques aren't working.

Direct download: Nymphing-Techniques-from-Across-the-Pond.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:59pm EDT

In the podcast this week, I go on a minor rant about the ethics of crowding on today's trout streams, and pretty much tell you if you don't like the crowds, take a hike (literally).  I do give some suggestions on how to handle crowded situations if you have no other choice, but there is almost always another choice.  And in the main part of the podcast, I share with you some fall fishing secrets. We have touched on this subject before, but since the last time I have received some more tips from all of you that I really shoudl share.

I also announce a very special contest for the best suggestion for next week's podcast.  The prize is an autographed copy of my new book, The Orvis Guide to The Essential American Flies, which is a large format book with spectacular color photos

Direct download: More_Fall_Fly_Fishing_Secrets.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:30pm EDT

I'm always confused by the science and physics of tides and how they vary and how they influence fish in salt water.  So I went right to the best source I know on all things saltwater related--Dr. Aaron Adams, director of Bonefish Tarpon Trust and one of my favorite fishing buddies.  Fishing with him is like fishing with Mr. Wizard (excuse me for dating myself here) and Aaron does not disappoint in our interview.  He takes the sceince behind tides and makes it clear and digestible to those of us who just like to fish in salt water.  There are some specific tips for fly fishing related to tides as well, and Aaron suggests some ways that fly fishers in particular can use tide predictions to have more success on the water.  It was a fun podcast for me as I learned a ton.

In the Fly Box,  I also answer a listeners question about how and why tailwater rivers are different and some tips on fishing them.

Direct download: The_Prince_of_Tides.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:28am EDT

This week I discuss a dozen tips for taking difficult risers. We're not always fortunate to find consistently rising fish, but when we do it's a chess match that can be the most fascinating aspect of trout fishing. There are many tips to finally fooling a difficult riser, and surprisingly few of them involve choosing the correct fly. We also have Fly Box short items on some questions that came up from listeners regarding last week's podcast on small stream fishing. And by popular demand, we'll continue our sections on great fly-fishing books and cool products you might have missed.

Test your wits with my quiz on difficult rises here.

 

Direct download: 12_tips_for_difficult_rises.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:06am EDT

In this week's podcast, we explore the world of small stream trout with 5 detailed tips (mainly because I was too lazy to organize more--actually there are probably about 20 tips included) that cover everything from what rod to use to how to find your own small stream.

There are tens of thousands of tiny trout streams in the United States, many of which never get fished or are fished infrequently, so it's a great place to get solitude and return to the essence of fly fishing. I also introduce two new items to the podcast, and we're looking for your feedback on these: a selected book of the week and "products you might have missed", a short section on handy fishing products that you might not have heard about. And, of course, we answer several questions in our popular "Fly Box" section

I am thrilled the podcast has grown so much, but I'm having a hard time keeping up with emails. I still want to hear from you, though as that is how we get material for the show! For podcast suggestions. please use the online forum at orvis.com/podcastfeedback or our voicemail line at 802-362-8800

Thanks for listening!

Direct download: Five_Big_Tips_for_Small_Stream_Fly_Fishing.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:44am EDT

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