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The Orvis Fly-Fishing Podcast

Produced by The Orvis Company and hosted by Tom Rosenbauer, author of The Orvis Fly-Fishing Guide, this podcast will provide you with tips on how to get the most of your time on the water. Read more about Orvis at www.orvis.com/podcast.

Bill Sisson [27:29] is the founding editor of Angler's Journal magazine and his recently published book, Seasons of the Striper, is an elegant pictorial love letter to striped bass fishing. Bill has seen many changes in the striped bass fishery over the years, and his family goes back for generations of striped bass anglers — both sport and commercial fishing. He tells some great stories of past striped bass escapades, which I know you'll enjoy listening to.

In the Fly Box this week, we have some solid questions and some informative information from listeners, including:

On a recent podcast a listener described a method of pre-tying nymphs on a dropper with a perfection loop, but I can't figure out how to attach them to my dry fly with a loop-loop connection. How do you accomplish this?

A listener gives us some great background on the history of public stream access in the United States.

A listener warns of of an alarming trend of beaver misinformation

Why do I keep losing trout on my barbless flies? Am I putting too much pressure on the fish?

What tips can you give me on fishing with my fiberglass rod in salt water?

I fish for bass in spring creeks.

Do you think they will be active in late fall and winter?

How do the gases in the exoskeleton of a midge pupa form?

Is there any hope of fishing a dry dropper in winter?

Do you have any tips for fishing small streams when there is ice in a creek?

Direct download: Seasons_of_the_Striper_with_Bill_Sisson.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:50pm EST

I get a lot of questions about midges and their life cycle, so I thought I would invite a professional entomologist to give us an overview of these insects and how to imitate them. Rick Hafele [3816] has not only been an entomologist all his working life, he's also a superb angler and fly-fishing author and perhaps one of the best authorities on aquatic entomology we have. Learn about what color midges to imitate, which part of their life cycle is most important to trout, and how to effectively fish these imitations. In

The Fly Box this week, we have some thought-provoking questions and some terrific suggestions from listeners, including:

I have used both rubber and felt soles and I still have problems wading. I am in good shape and have good balance. What wading shoes do you suggest?

I witnessed a huge hatch of insects but only caught largemouth bass. Is there a depth and current speed where fishing a dry fly is futile?

What type of poly leader would you suggest for my 5-weight rod?

How long should my leader be when fishing a poly leader?

What CFS do you consider safe to wade in a river?

If I catch a wild brown or rainbow in a brook trout stream, should I relocate that fish below a waterfall?

What is the purpose of releasing large hatchery brood stock trout into wild trout streams? Do they have any effect on a wild trout population?

How would you fish a slow, tannic river with a mud and sand bottom?

How long do you stay in one section of a river?

Should I match the diameter of the butt section of my leader to the diameter of my fly line?

What should I do if I hook a large striped bass and it thrashes close to me but does not take line. Should I try to get the line on the reel?

Some great tips from a South Dakota angler on how to find superb fly fishing close to home.

Direct download: All_About_Midges_with_Rick_Hafele.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:52pm EST

My guest this week is Steve Carew [40:58] of Fulling Mill Flies. Steve is the guy who gets fly patterns from an original sample to those gorgeous flies you see in the fly bins of your local Orvis store or dealer. How do commercial flies get made? Who are these people who tie flies for a living? Do they actually fish? How good are they? And how do they produce such consistent, high-quality flies in large volumes without sacrificing quality?

In the Fly Box this week, we have some helpful tips from listeners as well as some interesting questions, including:

A great tip on how to protect the tip of a fly rod when carrying it inside a vehicle fully assembled.

How do I know what color midge to use? Are there seasons and times when different colors work better than others?

I saw a carp feeding but tried a dozen flies and none of them worked. How can I catch these fish?

I fish a lake with trout, bass, pike, walleye, and perch in it. How can I target each one of these fish?

I am going to fish a lake and want to know what two fly lines I should take.

Does the newer technology Orvis uses in its fly rods make older rods obsolete?

I am fishing an older fiberglass rod and lost a bunch of fish. Do you think the rod is the problem?

I fish an aqueduct with steep banks that prevent a back-cast. Do you have any suggestions on fly lines?

A tip from a listener on gluing an aquarium thermometer to his net.

Do you think the occasional flip of my fins when using a float tube will spook fish?

Do you have any tips for mending a dry dropper rig without moving the fly?

What is Tom's favorite fly to tie and favorite fly to fish?

I purchased an old bamboo rod. How do I find out what line size it takes?

I saw some brook trout actively working a redd. Does that mean I should quit fishing that stream entirely?

Direct download: Where_flies_come_from_with_steve_carew.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:58pm EST

My guest this week is Alex Waller [41:36] from New Zealand. You've likely seen his great videos on Orvisnews.com or on You Tube, in his channel Trippin on Trout. Alex shares his techniques for fishing nymphs in late fall and winter with us, and his techniques are a bit different than what most of us use, so you make pick up some tips for your own trout fishing wherever you live. And because he often fishes for migratory rainbows coming out of giant Lake Taupo, his techniques will play well with Great Lakes "steelhead".

In the Fly Box this week, we have a host of interesting questions, including:

What is the most buoyant natural material for dry flies?

Does adding UV resin to dry flies affect their buoyancy?

What is the best way to carry and store tube flies?

Is there a universal rule for what size nymph you can use on a dry dropper?

How do I keep my hook gap clear of materials so I don't miss strikes?

What should I do when a big fish shakes its head when fighting?

If black is the most visible color for flies, why do some anglers prefer black hooks when fish are spooky?

If black is most visible in murky water, why do some people recommend bright flies under these conditions?

I am stuck in the rolling plains of the Midwest, four hours from a trout stream. Can I still go fly fishing?

A local river is highly pressured with very clear water, so everyone uses tiny midges.

Would a bigger fly work sometimes?

What is the best upgrade I can make to my Clearwater outfit, without spending hundreds of dollars?

Do you ever swing wet flies in small streams?

If so what leader do you use?

When do you use a strike indicator instead of a dry dropper?

And what kind do you use?

I have a floating line for striped bass fishing and have done well with it. What other line would you recommend?

What do you suggest if I want to try night fishing for striped bass?

Direct download: late_fall_and_winter_nymphing.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:34pm EST

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